Less SAID the better! Don’t you think? Remember these 3 Cs of Writing!


Writing dialogue help

When you are busy writing, it is easy to fall into the trap of writing the word “said” a lot, he said, she said, they said, you said, I said, we said, and so on. But what are some other words you could use instead?

Of course whether you can actually use these words for the article, poem, short story, novel, non-fiction book, or other, will largely depend on the three Cs; circumstances, context and overall content of what you are writing! And when you first put pen to paper, and you are drafting your initial thoughts, do not worry about always writing the word “said”. The most important thing for a writer to do, is to practise the art of writing and if you are too worried about being a perfectionist in those initial stages of writing whatever it is that you are working on, you won’t make much progress. In fact, you will stunt your own writing growth and that is the WORSE thing you want to do as a writer. You just want to get all the thoughts out of your head, the ideas, the dreams and visions, and not be held back by perfection. Finer details can be written as they are thought of, or can be elaborated on in the future, whatever you do, just remembering drafting is your friend and so is your writing, so don’t be too hard on it. And if “said” is the best word to use, or you are stuck for another word, just use it.

Many people want to write a book, or get a piece of writing published but they don’t. Why? Because they are worried about what people say, about being judged. I have to admit, it is scary when people can pick your work apart, having had no input into the amount of hard graft and slog you have had to go through, and life you have had to breathe into it, just for your writing to come to life and make it on the digital or paperback or hardback book shelf. But don’t let that stop you, yes, no one likes to see spelling mistakes and incorrect grammar and punctuation, but guess what? Even some of that is subjective! You heard me right! A single comma can go into a sentence in 3 different positions, for example, and still make sense, just where it is positioned can alter the way the reader thinks because of the emphasis it may or may not give to certain parts of the sentence. Then you have the American English spelling and the British English spelling, both of which are used and widely accepted, although you aren’t meant to mix the 2 in the same book, but is that going to be detrimental to getting your message across, not necessarily. Of course if you have a British character and American character and you use the American spelling of the words for the British and vice versa, it may have some impact, and if you keep chopping and changing spelling it may be annoying to the reader if they are not used to it, or it is highly noticeable to them, but if that is going to hold you back, just get your work out there and stop worrying. In my Asexual Perspectives 47 Asexual Stories book, I kept it raw and real by purposefully having both British English and American English spelling and different dialects in the same book, this way the reader knows I am not making their stories up – these are real life stories and I wanted to keep them that way, as raw and real as they come.

Now let me ask you a question. How many of those who are judging a writer’s work, have got a book published and can have the authority on what is the correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation, to always use? If they are not published themselves they don’t have that authority! It took me 2.5 years to get my first ever book out, it’s about redundancy, don’t make the mistake of never getting your piece out there. I have read books with lots of spelling and grammar mistakes but some of those sell better than others than are almost word perfect in the eyes of many – but those people are living their dreams, and leaving a lasting legacy! Don’t leave your legacy behind because those people who are judging you will be unlikely to care about you when you’re gone, but your writing will live on and help someone! Take action and write what you have always wanted to write, what you have always dreamed of writing, and what you were afraid to, and you can leave a comment below with the book you wrote and published AFTER the date of this post if it inspired you some way!

In the meantime, what other words do you like to use instead of the word “said”? Please write in the comments below as I love to read you!

As always, stay quirky and write soon,

Sandra xx

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7 Top Writing Tips From Author Ernest Hemingway


I think this is an amazing video compilation of 7 Top writing tips from Author Earnest Hemingway. I totally agree with him about leaving your written work for the day, still knowing what you are going to write next and NOT emptying all of your brain in this way. That way, you will never have writer’s block! – This is an invaluable tip!

I also love tip number 4, re-read what you have written before to enable continuity – I think this is so very important!

Which writing tip did you find most helpful and why?

As always, stay quirky and write soon

Sandra xx

Blogging Tips and Writing While Traveling – Guest post


Hi everyone

I have a special treat for you today. Jessica from Turquoise Compass is guest blogging about Blogging Tips and Writing While Traveling.

New Zealand
New Zealand

One of the most difficult things in being considered a blogger or writer, especially a travel writer, is coming up with original ideas for blog posts. Traveling and experiencing the world is the easy part, yet summarizing my experiences in a short blog post at times feels daunting. How can I capsulate a once in a lifetime experience in a mere 500-800 words and with just 8-10 pictures attached? I struggle to not write too much to bore my readers (yes, I can get wordy), yet at the same time I don’t want to write too little and not explain my journey completely. I want my readers to be left wanting more, yet left satisfied with the story-a complete beginning and end. What’s the moral of the story anyway? Continue reading “Blogging Tips and Writing While Traveling – Guest post”

A is for Appreciation of your reader (A-Z of writing)


Hi Everyone

Welcome to your A-Z of writing.

Over the coming weeks, I will be going through the A-Z of writing, giving hints, tips, information and advice on writing. Each post will start with a new alphabet letter, in sequence. I have just completed a Level 4 IAG Diploma. (Information, Advice and Guidance.) So lets see if I can put into practice, what I have learnt.

A is for appreciation of your reader. If it wasn’t for them, your audience, you would not be able to light up their life with your creative genius.

It is very important to:

  • Research what your reader wants
  • Add value to your reader’s life
  • Not patronise your readers
  • Attend book signings
  • Give talks
  • Interact with your readers as much as possible
  • Reply to your reader’s tweets and messages
  • Be grateful you are doing what you love
  • Show appreciation to each reader at every available opportunity

Thanks for taking the time to read this blog post, it is much appreciated.

Write soon

Sandra